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How will the aging of baby boomers affect caregiving in the US


Introduction

The aging of baby boomers is affecting caregiving in the US. I call it #DementiaWinter. And it's, coming. Soon, many of us won't even remember the American Dream...


As the baby boomers age and the number of people with Alzheimer's disease increases, more family caregivers will be needed than we have now.

As the baby boomers age and the number of people with Alzheimer's disease increases, more family caregivers will be needed than we have now.

The oldest members of your generation are now in their 50s or 60s—and they're not just on their own anymore. According to statistics from the National Institute on Aging, there were about 25 million older Americans ages 65 and older as of 2010; this number is expected to grow by 51% by 2030 (to an estimated 34 million). The median age for those in nursing homes has increased from 68 years old in 1995 to 71 today; meanwhile, people over 65 make up 14% of our population but 37% of all Medicare beneficiaries. By 2035 these figures could rise even further: In May 2018 The Economist predicted that within 25 years “nearly half America’s population will be over 65."

This could mean a shortage of family caregivers, putting more pressure on healthcare providers and nursing home care.

The baby boomers are getting older, meaning more of them will need care. The number of people with Alzheimer's disease is also increasing, and the needs of these patients will likely increase as well. If we don't have enough family caregivers to care for them, this could put more pressure on healthcare providers and nursing home care.

At least one in three people over 65 will die with some form of dementia.

Dementia is a broad term for loss of memory and other mental functions. It is not a normal part of aging but can occur as people age.

There are different kinds of dementia: Alzheimer's disease (AD), vascular dementia (VaD), Lewy body dementia (LBD), and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). AD affects about 7% to 10% of all older Americans, VaD affects about 1% to 2%, LBD affects about 5%, and FTLD accounts for less than 1%.

Alzheimer's disease is one type of dementia; it occurs when nerve cells in the brain fail to produce enough proteins that help maintain brain function

People caring for family members with Alzheimer's disease underestimate how much time and effort it takes.

I know this is true. My siblings and I never imagined my mom needing this level of care because we never imagined her lifestyle would lead to Alzheimer's.

Caregivers of people with Alzheimer's are often asked to take on more than they can handle. They may find themselves dealing with financial and medical issues and taking care of the person in their own home. I moved in with my mom and kept her in her own home for years until the neighborhood proved too dangerous. Thanks, redlining. I digress.

This puts them at a disadvantage when seeking help from others, who are likely unaware of what caregivers face every day. Caregivers need more support and recognition for all of the work they do for their loved ones.

Caregivers may have to deal with financial issues as well as medical issues.

Caregivers may have to deal with financial issues as well as medical issues.

Financial issues can arise when the caregiver needs to sell their home or other assets to pay for caregiving expenses, such as long-term care insurance and assisted living costs. If they don't have enough money saved up before they become ill, then they may not be able to afford these expenses at all. Caregivers should consider taking out long-term care insurance before becoming ill because it covers the cost of paying for someone else's nursing services and other medical costs if your injuries or illness prevents you from working (or even walking). This type of coverage usually comes with higher premiums. Still, it could save caregivers thousands over time if they ever needed help paying off those bills again—and possibly prevent them from selling their house!

We need to change our old ideas about caring for elderly people so that we can take care of the "baby boomers," who will be getting older soon.

We need to change our old ideas about caring for elderly people so that we can take care of the "baby boomers," who will be getting older soon.

The "baby boomers" are people born between 1946 and 1964 and are now aging into their 60s, 70s, and 80s. One out of every four Americans will be over 65 by 2030 (U.S Census Bureau).

Baby Boomers have been called the generation that saved the world from nuclear war by protesting against it during the 1960s when they were young adults living in college dormitories; they also helped end apartheid in South Africa through nonviolent protests on college campuses like Oxford University, where Nelson Mandela was studying law before becoming president after being imprisoned for 27 years without trial because he led anti-apartheid efforts while serving as secretary general for UN Human Rights Council under Jimmy Carter's presidency which began in 1977 after being elected president himself two years earlier.

Conclusion

The aging of the baby boomers will create many challenges, but we can overcome them if we work together. It will take more family caregivers and more government help in order for people to stay at home instead of entering nursing homes or assisted living facilities. We also need better social services so that people don't have as much stress when taking care of family members who are ill with Alzheimer's disease or other forms of dementia. Covid-19 proved how unprepared we are for mass illness. Dementia and Alzheimer's could prove disastrous for America if we don't prepare now.

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